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panda

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  1. Sad
    panda got a reaction from Weylon Santana in (Very Long) Plugins Guides (w/ Example)   
    Correct, it does not load UI position from the JSON file. It only loads the URL.
  2. Haha
    panda got a reaction from gooby in (Very Long) Plugins Guides (w/ Example)   
    I mean all of you downloaded Intersect for years before it was open source. If anything, the plugin system could open up an easier avenue for people to make cheats for games.
  3. Like
    panda reacted to OniSensei in Admin Tool   
    Hello again, so I was making an admin tool for myself and decided to just share it. It uses the API to fetch and change data withing your game server. This is also far from completed and may very well be buggy. Thanks xD
     
     
    Preview:

     
    Download:
    https://github.com/OniSensei/Intersect-Admin/releases/download/1.0.0.0/Amin.Editor.zip
     
    Source:
    https://github.com/OniSensei/Intersect-Admin
     
    Read the readme for more information.
  4. Like
    panda got a reaction from Zerin in server closing at opening?   
    Can you delete your error logs and regenerate them. There's nothing in the logs that would explain the symptoms you are describing.
  5. Like
    panda got a reaction from Zerin in server closing at opening?   
    Can we have the error log too?
  6. Like
    panda got a reaction from Khaikaa in Dev Blog 1/20/2021 - 2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7   
    2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7
    1/20/2021
     
    2020 Recap
    2020 was a long year. The road behind us is so long that I'm sure source release feels like it was years ago already, and the road ahead of us is still quite long too. We haven't had a Dev Blog in 9 months so this going to briefly cover everything behind us, explain the present, and peek into what the future will look like for Intersect.

    0.6.2 Branch
    April: Source Release 
    June: Automatic network key generation for source users
    August:
    MonoGame 3.8 from the official feed began improving speed hacking and lag detection September-December:
    Bug fixes (including fixing the client on Linux) minor improvements to timing End of December: master branch dropped from the repository, 6.2 moves from prerelease to main
     
    0.7.0 Branch
    March-July:
    Bug fixes development of the basic plugin system for client-side UI plugins July-September: Minor features, bug fixes
    October-December:
    More minor features bug fixes color adjustment for NPCs from @Cheshire basic action logging on the server side (logins, logouts, etc.) December-Now:
    refactoring of the packet handler system for large performance gains server-side plugin support networking support for plugins asset packing and obfuscation dynamic map layers cooldown groups  
    State of Beta 6.2 (0.6.2-beta)
    As of now, it is all but officially released. It's the main branch and will not have any new major features, but will continue to receive support and bug fixes. This will be officially released soon, but there's no reason for people to not start using it now. In theory we could have released this a long time ago, but we still had a rather steady stream of bug fixes for it. Once the Leafling release hit in December, active development on 0.6.2 was effectively dead and any remaining bugs were kicked to 0.7.

    State of Beta 7 (0.7.0-prerelease and 0.7.0-beta)
    Being real for a second, Beta 7 has been in development the entire time Beta 6.2 was, but the changes being made to the source code were sweeping and would break source modifications. Rather than create a lot of churn for developers, major new features were put into Beta 7 to keep major merges to a minimum. Originally, Beta 6.2 was supposed to release in September and Beta 7 at the end of 2020 -- plans changed.

    0.7.0-prerelease vs 0.7.0-beta
    Due to the massive influx of changes, we've split Beta 7 into two phases -- prerelease and beta.

    Prerelease is in the same state as 0.6.2-beta, it's "live" (and already in the prerelease branch) but not officially announced (until, I suppose, this post). Prerelease is for everyone who is uses Intersect but does not currently need to modify the source. This is to give everyone an opportunity to begin using the new Beta 7 features and testing its stability, as well as finally get access to the plugin system (which while it is not yet on the documentation website, there is an Intersect.Examples solution in the repository with example plugins demonstrating how to use the APIs -- writing plugins is safe, this will not be broken between prerelease and beta).

    Beta is the development branch and will be the "dangerous" branch for the next few months. With the exception of some changes that were harvested from Beta 7 branches and put into Leafling, most of the performance and major bug fixes have yet to be merged in, but this is the branch that they will be put into. The development branch will change a lot, and is not a good base for working with the source because of the amount of code that will soon change. For those of you who like a little bit of risk in their game development, feel free to base your work on the development branch. But keep in mind, here be dragons.
     
    Future of Intersect
    We've gotten to the point where many of the most requested and best features that we can add are simply too difficult to cleanly add or improve. Examples:
    Pixel movement Cross-platform Editor Server sharding Complete localization support Unity support for the client Mobile support Better party/guild (or "group") support Client user interface Complete source cleanup Camera controls Virtual events (sometimes code is just better than the event editor) .NET 5.0
    We have lofty goals for the future, but for the health of the engine and the games developed on it, it's now a necessity. As a result of this list, half of Beta 7 (though with the Leafling release and subsequent performance discoveries a lot was added back on), and all of Beta 8 and 9 were scrapped. Beta 7 will be the last major beta release.

    In all likelihood, many people who make source modifications on top of Beta 6.2 or 7 will not want to move on and redo all of their work on top of an Intersect that supports or is easily modified for the above list of changes, and so Beta 7 will be our first LTS release.
     
    The next major release after 0.7.0-beta will end up being 1.0-rc1. Unfortunately given the amount of changes that need to happen and the personal availability of the developers (in particular myself), any timeline and most specific details will not be realistic to give at this time. That said, in 1.0 we can look forward to at least the following:
    .NET 5.0 (we will be leaving .NET Framework behind, and we will be single-targeting .NET 5.0 -- no multitargeting to other versions of .NET Core or .NET Standard) Complete localization support (this includes content text for multi-lingual games) Client user interface overhaul (those pesky JSONs that are limited to some colors or pictures will be going away and replaced with a more markup-oriented interface system) Virtual events Basic server sharding Cross-platform Editor  
    Thanks to the community for sticking with us for this long, we hope to make Intersect easier to use for all of us and hopefully also give it a chance to live for years to come.
  7. Like
    panda got a reaction from Blinkuz in Dev Blog 1/20/2021 - 2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7   
    Or alternatively work on learning how to use the engine and in a couple of months when the dust settles make source changes then.
  8. Thanks
    panda got a reaction from Xiphoid in Dev Blog 1/20/2021 - 2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7   
    I'm going to reiterate that I explicitly did not include either of these in my list of "things that are coming".

    They're things that currently involve changing a significant amount of code in the engine, and the engine as it is makes them impossible to do easily.

    The goal is not Unity support, the goal is for the engine to be clean and well architected such that Unity support will be simple for someone to add.
  9. Like
    panda got a reaction from Mighty Professional in Who here has a SteelSeries RGB device   
    No Steel Series here, I have a Logitech G502 and Corsair Strafe RGB MK.2
  10. Like
    panda got a reaction from Ainz Ooal Gown in Dev Blog 1/20/2021 - 2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7   
    2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7
    1/20/2021
     
    2020 Recap
    2020 was a long year. The road behind us is so long that I'm sure source release feels like it was years ago already, and the road ahead of us is still quite long too. We haven't had a Dev Blog in 9 months so this going to briefly cover everything behind us, explain the present, and peek into what the future will look like for Intersect.

    0.6.2 Branch
    April: Source Release 
    June: Automatic network key generation for source users
    August:
    MonoGame 3.8 from the official feed began improving speed hacking and lag detection September-December:
    Bug fixes (including fixing the client on Linux) minor improvements to timing End of December: master branch dropped from the repository, 6.2 moves from prerelease to main
     
    0.7.0 Branch
    March-July:
    Bug fixes development of the basic plugin system for client-side UI plugins July-September: Minor features, bug fixes
    October-December:
    More minor features bug fixes color adjustment for NPCs from @Cheshire basic action logging on the server side (logins, logouts, etc.) December-Now:
    refactoring of the packet handler system for large performance gains server-side plugin support networking support for plugins asset packing and obfuscation dynamic map layers cooldown groups  
    State of Beta 6.2 (0.6.2-beta)
    As of now, it is all but officially released. It's the main branch and will not have any new major features, but will continue to receive support and bug fixes. This will be officially released soon, but there's no reason for people to not start using it now. In theory we could have released this a long time ago, but we still had a rather steady stream of bug fixes for it. Once the Leafling release hit in December, active development on 0.6.2 was effectively dead and any remaining bugs were kicked to 0.7.

    State of Beta 7 (0.7.0-prerelease and 0.7.0-beta)
    Being real for a second, Beta 7 has been in development the entire time Beta 6.2 was, but the changes being made to the source code were sweeping and would break source modifications. Rather than create a lot of churn for developers, major new features were put into Beta 7 to keep major merges to a minimum. Originally, Beta 6.2 was supposed to release in September and Beta 7 at the end of 2020 -- plans changed.

    0.7.0-prerelease vs 0.7.0-beta
    Due to the massive influx of changes, we've split Beta 7 into two phases -- prerelease and beta.

    Prerelease is in the same state as 0.6.2-beta, it's "live" (and already in the prerelease branch) but not officially announced (until, I suppose, this post). Prerelease is for everyone who is uses Intersect but does not currently need to modify the source. This is to give everyone an opportunity to begin using the new Beta 7 features and testing its stability, as well as finally get access to the plugin system (which while it is not yet on the documentation website, there is an Intersect.Examples solution in the repository with example plugins demonstrating how to use the APIs -- writing plugins is safe, this will not be broken between prerelease and beta).

    Beta is the development branch and will be the "dangerous" branch for the next few months. With the exception of some changes that were harvested from Beta 7 branches and put into Leafling, most of the performance and major bug fixes have yet to be merged in, but this is the branch that they will be put into. The development branch will change a lot, and is not a good base for working with the source because of the amount of code that will soon change. For those of you who like a little bit of risk in their game development, feel free to base your work on the development branch. But keep in mind, here be dragons.
     
    Future of Intersect
    We've gotten to the point where many of the most requested and best features that we can add are simply too difficult to cleanly add or improve. Examples:
    Pixel movement Cross-platform Editor Server sharding Complete localization support Unity support for the client Mobile support Better party/guild (or "group") support Client user interface Complete source cleanup Camera controls Virtual events (sometimes code is just better than the event editor) .NET 5.0
    We have lofty goals for the future, but for the health of the engine and the games developed on it, it's now a necessity. As a result of this list, half of Beta 7 (though with the Leafling release and subsequent performance discoveries a lot was added back on), and all of Beta 8 and 9 were scrapped. Beta 7 will be the last major beta release.

    In all likelihood, many people who make source modifications on top of Beta 6.2 or 7 will not want to move on and redo all of their work on top of an Intersect that supports or is easily modified for the above list of changes, and so Beta 7 will be our first LTS release.
     
    The next major release after 0.7.0-beta will end up being 1.0-rc1. Unfortunately given the amount of changes that need to happen and the personal availability of the developers (in particular myself), any timeline and most specific details will not be realistic to give at this time. That said, in 1.0 we can look forward to at least the following:
    .NET 5.0 (we will be leaving .NET Framework behind, and we will be single-targeting .NET 5.0 -- no multitargeting to other versions of .NET Core or .NET Standard) Complete localization support (this includes content text for multi-lingual games) Client user interface overhaul (those pesky JSONs that are limited to some colors or pictures will be going away and replaced with a more markup-oriented interface system) Virtual events Basic server sharding Cross-platform Editor  
    Thanks to the community for sticking with us for this long, we hope to make Intersect easier to use for all of us and hopefully also give it a chance to live for years to come.
  11. Like
    panda got a reaction from Kamus in Announcement   
    Try writing "your message in quotes".
  12. Like
    panda got a reaction from wishy in Dev Blog 1/20/2021 - 2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7   
    2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7
    1/20/2021
     
    2020 Recap
    2020 was a long year. The road behind us is so long that I'm sure source release feels like it was years ago already, and the road ahead of us is still quite long too. We haven't had a Dev Blog in 9 months so this going to briefly cover everything behind us, explain the present, and peek into what the future will look like for Intersect.

    0.6.2 Branch
    April: Source Release 
    June: Automatic network key generation for source users
    August:
    MonoGame 3.8 from the official feed began improving speed hacking and lag detection September-December:
    Bug fixes (including fixing the client on Linux) minor improvements to timing End of December: master branch dropped from the repository, 6.2 moves from prerelease to main
     
    0.7.0 Branch
    March-July:
    Bug fixes development of the basic plugin system for client-side UI plugins July-September: Minor features, bug fixes
    October-December:
    More minor features bug fixes color adjustment for NPCs from @Cheshire basic action logging on the server side (logins, logouts, etc.) December-Now:
    refactoring of the packet handler system for large performance gains server-side plugin support networking support for plugins asset packing and obfuscation dynamic map layers cooldown groups  
    State of Beta 6.2 (0.6.2-beta)
    As of now, it is all but officially released. It's the main branch and will not have any new major features, but will continue to receive support and bug fixes. This will be officially released soon, but there's no reason for people to not start using it now. In theory we could have released this a long time ago, but we still had a rather steady stream of bug fixes for it. Once the Leafling release hit in December, active development on 0.6.2 was effectively dead and any remaining bugs were kicked to 0.7.

    State of Beta 7 (0.7.0-prerelease and 0.7.0-beta)
    Being real for a second, Beta 7 has been in development the entire time Beta 6.2 was, but the changes being made to the source code were sweeping and would break source modifications. Rather than create a lot of churn for developers, major new features were put into Beta 7 to keep major merges to a minimum. Originally, Beta 6.2 was supposed to release in September and Beta 7 at the end of 2020 -- plans changed.

    0.7.0-prerelease vs 0.7.0-beta
    Due to the massive influx of changes, we've split Beta 7 into two phases -- prerelease and beta.

    Prerelease is in the same state as 0.6.2-beta, it's "live" (and already in the prerelease branch) but not officially announced (until, I suppose, this post). Prerelease is for everyone who is uses Intersect but does not currently need to modify the source. This is to give everyone an opportunity to begin using the new Beta 7 features and testing its stability, as well as finally get access to the plugin system (which while it is not yet on the documentation website, there is an Intersect.Examples solution in the repository with example plugins demonstrating how to use the APIs -- writing plugins is safe, this will not be broken between prerelease and beta).

    Beta is the development branch and will be the "dangerous" branch for the next few months. With the exception of some changes that were harvested from Beta 7 branches and put into Leafling, most of the performance and major bug fixes have yet to be merged in, but this is the branch that they will be put into. The development branch will change a lot, and is not a good base for working with the source because of the amount of code that will soon change. For those of you who like a little bit of risk in their game development, feel free to base your work on the development branch. But keep in mind, here be dragons.
     
    Future of Intersect
    We've gotten to the point where many of the most requested and best features that we can add are simply too difficult to cleanly add or improve. Examples:
    Pixel movement Cross-platform Editor Server sharding Complete localization support Unity support for the client Mobile support Better party/guild (or "group") support Client user interface Complete source cleanup Camera controls Virtual events (sometimes code is just better than the event editor) .NET 5.0
    We have lofty goals for the future, but for the health of the engine and the games developed on it, it's now a necessity. As a result of this list, half of Beta 7 (though with the Leafling release and subsequent performance discoveries a lot was added back on), and all of Beta 8 and 9 were scrapped. Beta 7 will be the last major beta release.

    In all likelihood, many people who make source modifications on top of Beta 6.2 or 7 will not want to move on and redo all of their work on top of an Intersect that supports or is easily modified for the above list of changes, and so Beta 7 will be our first LTS release.
     
    The next major release after 0.7.0-beta will end up being 1.0-rc1. Unfortunately given the amount of changes that need to happen and the personal availability of the developers (in particular myself), any timeline and most specific details will not be realistic to give at this time. That said, in 1.0 we can look forward to at least the following:
    .NET 5.0 (we will be leaving .NET Framework behind, and we will be single-targeting .NET 5.0 -- no multitargeting to other versions of .NET Core or .NET Standard) Complete localization support (this includes content text for multi-lingual games) Client user interface overhaul (those pesky JSONs that are limited to some colors or pictures will be going away and replaced with a more markup-oriented interface system) Virtual events Basic server sharding Cross-platform Editor  
    Thanks to the community for sticking with us for this long, we hope to make Intersect easier to use for all of us and hopefully also give it a chance to live for years to come.
  13. Thanks
    panda got a reaction from Weylon Santana in Announcement   
    Try writing "your message in quotes".
  14. Like
    panda got a reaction from Scaly in Dev Blog 1/20/2021 - 2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7   
    2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7
    1/20/2021
     
    2020 Recap
    2020 was a long year. The road behind us is so long that I'm sure source release feels like it was years ago already, and the road ahead of us is still quite long too. We haven't had a Dev Blog in 9 months so this going to briefly cover everything behind us, explain the present, and peek into what the future will look like for Intersect.

    0.6.2 Branch
    April: Source Release 
    June: Automatic network key generation for source users
    August:
    MonoGame 3.8 from the official feed began improving speed hacking and lag detection September-December:
    Bug fixes (including fixing the client on Linux) minor improvements to timing End of December: master branch dropped from the repository, 6.2 moves from prerelease to main
     
    0.7.0 Branch
    March-July:
    Bug fixes development of the basic plugin system for client-side UI plugins July-September: Minor features, bug fixes
    October-December:
    More minor features bug fixes color adjustment for NPCs from @Cheshire basic action logging on the server side (logins, logouts, etc.) December-Now:
    refactoring of the packet handler system for large performance gains server-side plugin support networking support for plugins asset packing and obfuscation dynamic map layers cooldown groups  
    State of Beta 6.2 (0.6.2-beta)
    As of now, it is all but officially released. It's the main branch and will not have any new major features, but will continue to receive support and bug fixes. This will be officially released soon, but there's no reason for people to not start using it now. In theory we could have released this a long time ago, but we still had a rather steady stream of bug fixes for it. Once the Leafling release hit in December, active development on 0.6.2 was effectively dead and any remaining bugs were kicked to 0.7.

    State of Beta 7 (0.7.0-prerelease and 0.7.0-beta)
    Being real for a second, Beta 7 has been in development the entire time Beta 6.2 was, but the changes being made to the source code were sweeping and would break source modifications. Rather than create a lot of churn for developers, major new features were put into Beta 7 to keep major merges to a minimum. Originally, Beta 6.2 was supposed to release in September and Beta 7 at the end of 2020 -- plans changed.

    0.7.0-prerelease vs 0.7.0-beta
    Due to the massive influx of changes, we've split Beta 7 into two phases -- prerelease and beta.

    Prerelease is in the same state as 0.6.2-beta, it's "live" (and already in the prerelease branch) but not officially announced (until, I suppose, this post). Prerelease is for everyone who is uses Intersect but does not currently need to modify the source. This is to give everyone an opportunity to begin using the new Beta 7 features and testing its stability, as well as finally get access to the plugin system (which while it is not yet on the documentation website, there is an Intersect.Examples solution in the repository with example plugins demonstrating how to use the APIs -- writing plugins is safe, this will not be broken between prerelease and beta).

    Beta is the development branch and will be the "dangerous" branch for the next few months. With the exception of some changes that were harvested from Beta 7 branches and put into Leafling, most of the performance and major bug fixes have yet to be merged in, but this is the branch that they will be put into. The development branch will change a lot, and is not a good base for working with the source because of the amount of code that will soon change. For those of you who like a little bit of risk in their game development, feel free to base your work on the development branch. But keep in mind, here be dragons.
     
    Future of Intersect
    We've gotten to the point where many of the most requested and best features that we can add are simply too difficult to cleanly add or improve. Examples:
    Pixel movement Cross-platform Editor Server sharding Complete localization support Unity support for the client Mobile support Better party/guild (or "group") support Client user interface Complete source cleanup Camera controls Virtual events (sometimes code is just better than the event editor) .NET 5.0
    We have lofty goals for the future, but for the health of the engine and the games developed on it, it's now a necessity. As a result of this list, half of Beta 7 (though with the Leafling release and subsequent performance discoveries a lot was added back on), and all of Beta 8 and 9 were scrapped. Beta 7 will be the last major beta release.

    In all likelihood, many people who make source modifications on top of Beta 6.2 or 7 will not want to move on and redo all of their work on top of an Intersect that supports or is easily modified for the above list of changes, and so Beta 7 will be our first LTS release.
     
    The next major release after 0.7.0-beta will end up being 1.0-rc1. Unfortunately given the amount of changes that need to happen and the personal availability of the developers (in particular myself), any timeline and most specific details will not be realistic to give at this time. That said, in 1.0 we can look forward to at least the following:
    .NET 5.0 (we will be leaving .NET Framework behind, and we will be single-targeting .NET 5.0 -- no multitargeting to other versions of .NET Core or .NET Standard) Complete localization support (this includes content text for multi-lingual games) Client user interface overhaul (those pesky JSONs that are limited to some colors or pictures will be going away and replaced with a more markup-oriented interface system) Virtual events Basic server sharding Cross-platform Editor  
    Thanks to the community for sticking with us for this long, we hope to make Intersect easier to use for all of us and hopefully also give it a chance to live for years to come.
  15. Like
    panda got a reaction from Worldofjimmy in Dev Blog 1/20/2021 - 2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7   
    2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7
    1/20/2021
     
    2020 Recap
    2020 was a long year. The road behind us is so long that I'm sure source release feels like it was years ago already, and the road ahead of us is still quite long too. We haven't had a Dev Blog in 9 months so this going to briefly cover everything behind us, explain the present, and peek into what the future will look like for Intersect.

    0.6.2 Branch
    April: Source Release 
    June: Automatic network key generation for source users
    August:
    MonoGame 3.8 from the official feed began improving speed hacking and lag detection September-December:
    Bug fixes (including fixing the client on Linux) minor improvements to timing End of December: master branch dropped from the repository, 6.2 moves from prerelease to main
     
    0.7.0 Branch
    March-July:
    Bug fixes development of the basic plugin system for client-side UI plugins July-September: Minor features, bug fixes
    October-December:
    More minor features bug fixes color adjustment for NPCs from @Cheshire basic action logging on the server side (logins, logouts, etc.) December-Now:
    refactoring of the packet handler system for large performance gains server-side plugin support networking support for plugins asset packing and obfuscation dynamic map layers cooldown groups  
    State of Beta 6.2 (0.6.2-beta)
    As of now, it is all but officially released. It's the main branch and will not have any new major features, but will continue to receive support and bug fixes. This will be officially released soon, but there's no reason for people to not start using it now. In theory we could have released this a long time ago, but we still had a rather steady stream of bug fixes for it. Once the Leafling release hit in December, active development on 0.6.2 was effectively dead and any remaining bugs were kicked to 0.7.

    State of Beta 7 (0.7.0-prerelease and 0.7.0-beta)
    Being real for a second, Beta 7 has been in development the entire time Beta 6.2 was, but the changes being made to the source code were sweeping and would break source modifications. Rather than create a lot of churn for developers, major new features were put into Beta 7 to keep major merges to a minimum. Originally, Beta 6.2 was supposed to release in September and Beta 7 at the end of 2020 -- plans changed.

    0.7.0-prerelease vs 0.7.0-beta
    Due to the massive influx of changes, we've split Beta 7 into two phases -- prerelease and beta.

    Prerelease is in the same state as 0.6.2-beta, it's "live" (and already in the prerelease branch) but not officially announced (until, I suppose, this post). Prerelease is for everyone who is uses Intersect but does not currently need to modify the source. This is to give everyone an opportunity to begin using the new Beta 7 features and testing its stability, as well as finally get access to the plugin system (which while it is not yet on the documentation website, there is an Intersect.Examples solution in the repository with example plugins demonstrating how to use the APIs -- writing plugins is safe, this will not be broken between prerelease and beta).

    Beta is the development branch and will be the "dangerous" branch for the next few months. With the exception of some changes that were harvested from Beta 7 branches and put into Leafling, most of the performance and major bug fixes have yet to be merged in, but this is the branch that they will be put into. The development branch will change a lot, and is not a good base for working with the source because of the amount of code that will soon change. For those of you who like a little bit of risk in their game development, feel free to base your work on the development branch. But keep in mind, here be dragons.
     
    Future of Intersect
    We've gotten to the point where many of the most requested and best features that we can add are simply too difficult to cleanly add or improve. Examples:
    Pixel movement Cross-platform Editor Server sharding Complete localization support Unity support for the client Mobile support Better party/guild (or "group") support Client user interface Complete source cleanup Camera controls Virtual events (sometimes code is just better than the event editor) .NET 5.0
    We have lofty goals for the future, but for the health of the engine and the games developed on it, it's now a necessity. As a result of this list, half of Beta 7 (though with the Leafling release and subsequent performance discoveries a lot was added back on), and all of Beta 8 and 9 were scrapped. Beta 7 will be the last major beta release.

    In all likelihood, many people who make source modifications on top of Beta 6.2 or 7 will not want to move on and redo all of their work on top of an Intersect that supports or is easily modified for the above list of changes, and so Beta 7 will be our first LTS release.
     
    The next major release after 0.7.0-beta will end up being 1.0-rc1. Unfortunately given the amount of changes that need to happen and the personal availability of the developers (in particular myself), any timeline and most specific details will not be realistic to give at this time. That said, in 1.0 we can look forward to at least the following:
    .NET 5.0 (we will be leaving .NET Framework behind, and we will be single-targeting .NET 5.0 -- no multitargeting to other versions of .NET Core or .NET Standard) Complete localization support (this includes content text for multi-lingual games) Client user interface overhaul (those pesky JSONs that are limited to some colors or pictures will be going away and replaced with a more markup-oriented interface system) Virtual events Basic server sharding Cross-platform Editor  
    Thanks to the community for sticking with us for this long, we hope to make Intersect easier to use for all of us and hopefully also give it a chance to live for years to come.
  16. Like
    panda got a reaction from Meddy in Dev Blog 1/20/2021 - 2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7   
    2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7
    1/20/2021
     
    2020 Recap
    2020 was a long year. The road behind us is so long that I'm sure source release feels like it was years ago already, and the road ahead of us is still quite long too. We haven't had a Dev Blog in 9 months so this going to briefly cover everything behind us, explain the present, and peek into what the future will look like for Intersect.

    0.6.2 Branch
    April: Source Release 
    June: Automatic network key generation for source users
    August:
    MonoGame 3.8 from the official feed began improving speed hacking and lag detection September-December:
    Bug fixes (including fixing the client on Linux) minor improvements to timing End of December: master branch dropped from the repository, 6.2 moves from prerelease to main
     
    0.7.0 Branch
    March-July:
    Bug fixes development of the basic plugin system for client-side UI plugins July-September: Minor features, bug fixes
    October-December:
    More minor features bug fixes color adjustment for NPCs from @Cheshire basic action logging on the server side (logins, logouts, etc.) December-Now:
    refactoring of the packet handler system for large performance gains server-side plugin support networking support for plugins asset packing and obfuscation dynamic map layers cooldown groups  
    State of Beta 6.2 (0.6.2-beta)
    As of now, it is all but officially released. It's the main branch and will not have any new major features, but will continue to receive support and bug fixes. This will be officially released soon, but there's no reason for people to not start using it now. In theory we could have released this a long time ago, but we still had a rather steady stream of bug fixes for it. Once the Leafling release hit in December, active development on 0.6.2 was effectively dead and any remaining bugs were kicked to 0.7.

    State of Beta 7 (0.7.0-prerelease and 0.7.0-beta)
    Being real for a second, Beta 7 has been in development the entire time Beta 6.2 was, but the changes being made to the source code were sweeping and would break source modifications. Rather than create a lot of churn for developers, major new features were put into Beta 7 to keep major merges to a minimum. Originally, Beta 6.2 was supposed to release in September and Beta 7 at the end of 2020 -- plans changed.

    0.7.0-prerelease vs 0.7.0-beta
    Due to the massive influx of changes, we've split Beta 7 into two phases -- prerelease and beta.

    Prerelease is in the same state as 0.6.2-beta, it's "live" (and already in the prerelease branch) but not officially announced (until, I suppose, this post). Prerelease is for everyone who is uses Intersect but does not currently need to modify the source. This is to give everyone an opportunity to begin using the new Beta 7 features and testing its stability, as well as finally get access to the plugin system (which while it is not yet on the documentation website, there is an Intersect.Examples solution in the repository with example plugins demonstrating how to use the APIs -- writing plugins is safe, this will not be broken between prerelease and beta).

    Beta is the development branch and will be the "dangerous" branch for the next few months. With the exception of some changes that were harvested from Beta 7 branches and put into Leafling, most of the performance and major bug fixes have yet to be merged in, but this is the branch that they will be put into. The development branch will change a lot, and is not a good base for working with the source because of the amount of code that will soon change. For those of you who like a little bit of risk in their game development, feel free to base your work on the development branch. But keep in mind, here be dragons.
     
    Future of Intersect
    We've gotten to the point where many of the most requested and best features that we can add are simply too difficult to cleanly add or improve. Examples:
    Pixel movement Cross-platform Editor Server sharding Complete localization support Unity support for the client Mobile support Better party/guild (or "group") support Client user interface Complete source cleanup Camera controls Virtual events (sometimes code is just better than the event editor) .NET 5.0
    We have lofty goals for the future, but for the health of the engine and the games developed on it, it's now a necessity. As a result of this list, half of Beta 7 (though with the Leafling release and subsequent performance discoveries a lot was added back on), and all of Beta 8 and 9 were scrapped. Beta 7 will be the last major beta release.

    In all likelihood, many people who make source modifications on top of Beta 6.2 or 7 will not want to move on and redo all of their work on top of an Intersect that supports or is easily modified for the above list of changes, and so Beta 7 will be our first LTS release.
     
    The next major release after 0.7.0-beta will end up being 1.0-rc1. Unfortunately given the amount of changes that need to happen and the personal availability of the developers (in particular myself), any timeline and most specific details will not be realistic to give at this time. That said, in 1.0 we can look forward to at least the following:
    .NET 5.0 (we will be leaving .NET Framework behind, and we will be single-targeting .NET 5.0 -- no multitargeting to other versions of .NET Core or .NET Standard) Complete localization support (this includes content text for multi-lingual games) Client user interface overhaul (those pesky JSONs that are limited to some colors or pictures will be going away and replaced with a more markup-oriented interface system) Virtual events Basic server sharding Cross-platform Editor  
    Thanks to the community for sticking with us for this long, we hope to make Intersect easier to use for all of us and hopefully also give it a chance to live for years to come.
  17. Like
    panda got a reaction from Shenmue in Dev Blog 1/20/2021 - 2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7   
    2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7
    1/20/2021
     
    2020 Recap
    2020 was a long year. The road behind us is so long that I'm sure source release feels like it was years ago already, and the road ahead of us is still quite long too. We haven't had a Dev Blog in 9 months so this going to briefly cover everything behind us, explain the present, and peek into what the future will look like for Intersect.

    0.6.2 Branch
    April: Source Release 
    June: Automatic network key generation for source users
    August:
    MonoGame 3.8 from the official feed began improving speed hacking and lag detection September-December:
    Bug fixes (including fixing the client on Linux) minor improvements to timing End of December: master branch dropped from the repository, 6.2 moves from prerelease to main
     
    0.7.0 Branch
    March-July:
    Bug fixes development of the basic plugin system for client-side UI plugins July-September: Minor features, bug fixes
    October-December:
    More minor features bug fixes color adjustment for NPCs from @Cheshire basic action logging on the server side (logins, logouts, etc.) December-Now:
    refactoring of the packet handler system for large performance gains server-side plugin support networking support for plugins asset packing and obfuscation dynamic map layers cooldown groups  
    State of Beta 6.2 (0.6.2-beta)
    As of now, it is all but officially released. It's the main branch and will not have any new major features, but will continue to receive support and bug fixes. This will be officially released soon, but there's no reason for people to not start using it now. In theory we could have released this a long time ago, but we still had a rather steady stream of bug fixes for it. Once the Leafling release hit in December, active development on 0.6.2 was effectively dead and any remaining bugs were kicked to 0.7.

    State of Beta 7 (0.7.0-prerelease and 0.7.0-beta)
    Being real for a second, Beta 7 has been in development the entire time Beta 6.2 was, but the changes being made to the source code were sweeping and would break source modifications. Rather than create a lot of churn for developers, major new features were put into Beta 7 to keep major merges to a minimum. Originally, Beta 6.2 was supposed to release in September and Beta 7 at the end of 2020 -- plans changed.

    0.7.0-prerelease vs 0.7.0-beta
    Due to the massive influx of changes, we've split Beta 7 into two phases -- prerelease and beta.

    Prerelease is in the same state as 0.6.2-beta, it's "live" (and already in the prerelease branch) but not officially announced (until, I suppose, this post). Prerelease is for everyone who is uses Intersect but does not currently need to modify the source. This is to give everyone an opportunity to begin using the new Beta 7 features and testing its stability, as well as finally get access to the plugin system (which while it is not yet on the documentation website, there is an Intersect.Examples solution in the repository with example plugins demonstrating how to use the APIs -- writing plugins is safe, this will not be broken between prerelease and beta).

    Beta is the development branch and will be the "dangerous" branch for the next few months. With the exception of some changes that were harvested from Beta 7 branches and put into Leafling, most of the performance and major bug fixes have yet to be merged in, but this is the branch that they will be put into. The development branch will change a lot, and is not a good base for working with the source because of the amount of code that will soon change. For those of you who like a little bit of risk in their game development, feel free to base your work on the development branch. But keep in mind, here be dragons.
     
    Future of Intersect
    We've gotten to the point where many of the most requested and best features that we can add are simply too difficult to cleanly add or improve. Examples:
    Pixel movement Cross-platform Editor Server sharding Complete localization support Unity support for the client Mobile support Better party/guild (or "group") support Client user interface Complete source cleanup Camera controls Virtual events (sometimes code is just better than the event editor) .NET 5.0
    We have lofty goals for the future, but for the health of the engine and the games developed on it, it's now a necessity. As a result of this list, half of Beta 7 (though with the Leafling release and subsequent performance discoveries a lot was added back on), and all of Beta 8 and 9 were scrapped. Beta 7 will be the last major beta release.

    In all likelihood, many people who make source modifications on top of Beta 6.2 or 7 will not want to move on and redo all of their work on top of an Intersect that supports or is easily modified for the above list of changes, and so Beta 7 will be our first LTS release.
     
    The next major release after 0.7.0-beta will end up being 1.0-rc1. Unfortunately given the amount of changes that need to happen and the personal availability of the developers (in particular myself), any timeline and most specific details will not be realistic to give at this time. That said, in 1.0 we can look forward to at least the following:
    .NET 5.0 (we will be leaving .NET Framework behind, and we will be single-targeting .NET 5.0 -- no multitargeting to other versions of .NET Core or .NET Standard) Complete localization support (this includes content text for multi-lingual games) Client user interface overhaul (those pesky JSONs that are limited to some colors or pictures will be going away and replaced with a more markup-oriented interface system) Virtual events Basic server sharding Cross-platform Editor  
    Thanks to the community for sticking with us for this long, we hope to make Intersect easier to use for all of us and hopefully also give it a chance to live for years to come.
  18. Like
    panda got a reaction from Kamus in Dev Blog 1/20/2021 - 2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7   
    2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7
    1/20/2021
     
    2020 Recap
    2020 was a long year. The road behind us is so long that I'm sure source release feels like it was years ago already, and the road ahead of us is still quite long too. We haven't had a Dev Blog in 9 months so this going to briefly cover everything behind us, explain the present, and peek into what the future will look like for Intersect.

    0.6.2 Branch
    April: Source Release 
    June: Automatic network key generation for source users
    August:
    MonoGame 3.8 from the official feed began improving speed hacking and lag detection September-December:
    Bug fixes (including fixing the client on Linux) minor improvements to timing End of December: master branch dropped from the repository, 6.2 moves from prerelease to main
     
    0.7.0 Branch
    March-July:
    Bug fixes development of the basic plugin system for client-side UI plugins July-September: Minor features, bug fixes
    October-December:
    More minor features bug fixes color adjustment for NPCs from @Cheshire basic action logging on the server side (logins, logouts, etc.) December-Now:
    refactoring of the packet handler system for large performance gains server-side plugin support networking support for plugins asset packing and obfuscation dynamic map layers cooldown groups  
    State of Beta 6.2 (0.6.2-beta)
    As of now, it is all but officially released. It's the main branch and will not have any new major features, but will continue to receive support and bug fixes. This will be officially released soon, but there's no reason for people to not start using it now. In theory we could have released this a long time ago, but we still had a rather steady stream of bug fixes for it. Once the Leafling release hit in December, active development on 0.6.2 was effectively dead and any remaining bugs were kicked to 0.7.

    State of Beta 7 (0.7.0-prerelease and 0.7.0-beta)
    Being real for a second, Beta 7 has been in development the entire time Beta 6.2 was, but the changes being made to the source code were sweeping and would break source modifications. Rather than create a lot of churn for developers, major new features were put into Beta 7 to keep major merges to a minimum. Originally, Beta 6.2 was supposed to release in September and Beta 7 at the end of 2020 -- plans changed.

    0.7.0-prerelease vs 0.7.0-beta
    Due to the massive influx of changes, we've split Beta 7 into two phases -- prerelease and beta.

    Prerelease is in the same state as 0.6.2-beta, it's "live" (and already in the prerelease branch) but not officially announced (until, I suppose, this post). Prerelease is for everyone who is uses Intersect but does not currently need to modify the source. This is to give everyone an opportunity to begin using the new Beta 7 features and testing its stability, as well as finally get access to the plugin system (which while it is not yet on the documentation website, there is an Intersect.Examples solution in the repository with example plugins demonstrating how to use the APIs -- writing plugins is safe, this will not be broken between prerelease and beta).

    Beta is the development branch and will be the "dangerous" branch for the next few months. With the exception of some changes that were harvested from Beta 7 branches and put into Leafling, most of the performance and major bug fixes have yet to be merged in, but this is the branch that they will be put into. The development branch will change a lot, and is not a good base for working with the source because of the amount of code that will soon change. For those of you who like a little bit of risk in their game development, feel free to base your work on the development branch. But keep in mind, here be dragons.
     
    Future of Intersect
    We've gotten to the point where many of the most requested and best features that we can add are simply too difficult to cleanly add or improve. Examples:
    Pixel movement Cross-platform Editor Server sharding Complete localization support Unity support for the client Mobile support Better party/guild (or "group") support Client user interface Complete source cleanup Camera controls Virtual events (sometimes code is just better than the event editor) .NET 5.0
    We have lofty goals for the future, but for the health of the engine and the games developed on it, it's now a necessity. As a result of this list, half of Beta 7 (though with the Leafling release and subsequent performance discoveries a lot was added back on), and all of Beta 8 and 9 were scrapped. Beta 7 will be the last major beta release.

    In all likelihood, many people who make source modifications on top of Beta 6.2 or 7 will not want to move on and redo all of their work on top of an Intersect that supports or is easily modified for the above list of changes, and so Beta 7 will be our first LTS release.
     
    The next major release after 0.7.0-beta will end up being 1.0-rc1. Unfortunately given the amount of changes that need to happen and the personal availability of the developers (in particular myself), any timeline and most specific details will not be realistic to give at this time. That said, in 1.0 we can look forward to at least the following:
    .NET 5.0 (we will be leaving .NET Framework behind, and we will be single-targeting .NET 5.0 -- no multitargeting to other versions of .NET Core or .NET Standard) Complete localization support (this includes content text for multi-lingual games) Client user interface overhaul (those pesky JSONs that are limited to some colors or pictures will be going away and replaced with a more markup-oriented interface system) Virtual events Basic server sharding Cross-platform Editor  
    Thanks to the community for sticking with us for this long, we hope to make Intersect easier to use for all of us and hopefully also give it a chance to live for years to come.
  19. Like
    panda got a reaction from Alexoune001 in Dev Blog 1/20/2021 - 2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7   
    2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7
    1/20/2021
     
    2020 Recap
    2020 was a long year. The road behind us is so long that I'm sure source release feels like it was years ago already, and the road ahead of us is still quite long too. We haven't had a Dev Blog in 9 months so this going to briefly cover everything behind us, explain the present, and peek into what the future will look like for Intersect.

    0.6.2 Branch
    April: Source Release 
    June: Automatic network key generation for source users
    August:
    MonoGame 3.8 from the official feed began improving speed hacking and lag detection September-December:
    Bug fixes (including fixing the client on Linux) minor improvements to timing End of December: master branch dropped from the repository, 6.2 moves from prerelease to main
     
    0.7.0 Branch
    March-July:
    Bug fixes development of the basic plugin system for client-side UI plugins July-September: Minor features, bug fixes
    October-December:
    More minor features bug fixes color adjustment for NPCs from @Cheshire basic action logging on the server side (logins, logouts, etc.) December-Now:
    refactoring of the packet handler system for large performance gains server-side plugin support networking support for plugins asset packing and obfuscation dynamic map layers cooldown groups  
    State of Beta 6.2 (0.6.2-beta)
    As of now, it is all but officially released. It's the main branch and will not have any new major features, but will continue to receive support and bug fixes. This will be officially released soon, but there's no reason for people to not start using it now. In theory we could have released this a long time ago, but we still had a rather steady stream of bug fixes for it. Once the Leafling release hit in December, active development on 0.6.2 was effectively dead and any remaining bugs were kicked to 0.7.

    State of Beta 7 (0.7.0-prerelease and 0.7.0-beta)
    Being real for a second, Beta 7 has been in development the entire time Beta 6.2 was, but the changes being made to the source code were sweeping and would break source modifications. Rather than create a lot of churn for developers, major new features were put into Beta 7 to keep major merges to a minimum. Originally, Beta 6.2 was supposed to release in September and Beta 7 at the end of 2020 -- plans changed.

    0.7.0-prerelease vs 0.7.0-beta
    Due to the massive influx of changes, we've split Beta 7 into two phases -- prerelease and beta.

    Prerelease is in the same state as 0.6.2-beta, it's "live" (and already in the prerelease branch) but not officially announced (until, I suppose, this post). Prerelease is for everyone who is uses Intersect but does not currently need to modify the source. This is to give everyone an opportunity to begin using the new Beta 7 features and testing its stability, as well as finally get access to the plugin system (which while it is not yet on the documentation website, there is an Intersect.Examples solution in the repository with example plugins demonstrating how to use the APIs -- writing plugins is safe, this will not be broken between prerelease and beta).

    Beta is the development branch and will be the "dangerous" branch for the next few months. With the exception of some changes that were harvested from Beta 7 branches and put into Leafling, most of the performance and major bug fixes have yet to be merged in, but this is the branch that they will be put into. The development branch will change a lot, and is not a good base for working with the source because of the amount of code that will soon change. For those of you who like a little bit of risk in their game development, feel free to base your work on the development branch. But keep in mind, here be dragons.
     
    Future of Intersect
    We've gotten to the point where many of the most requested and best features that we can add are simply too difficult to cleanly add or improve. Examples:
    Pixel movement Cross-platform Editor Server sharding Complete localization support Unity support for the client Mobile support Better party/guild (or "group") support Client user interface Complete source cleanup Camera controls Virtual events (sometimes code is just better than the event editor) .NET 5.0
    We have lofty goals for the future, but for the health of the engine and the games developed on it, it's now a necessity. As a result of this list, half of Beta 7 (though with the Leafling release and subsequent performance discoveries a lot was added back on), and all of Beta 8 and 9 were scrapped. Beta 7 will be the last major beta release.

    In all likelihood, many people who make source modifications on top of Beta 6.2 or 7 will not want to move on and redo all of their work on top of an Intersect that supports or is easily modified for the above list of changes, and so Beta 7 will be our first LTS release.
     
    The next major release after 0.7.0-beta will end up being 1.0-rc1. Unfortunately given the amount of changes that need to happen and the personal availability of the developers (in particular myself), any timeline and most specific details will not be realistic to give at this time. That said, in 1.0 we can look forward to at least the following:
    .NET 5.0 (we will be leaving .NET Framework behind, and we will be single-targeting .NET 5.0 -- no multitargeting to other versions of .NET Core or .NET Standard) Complete localization support (this includes content text for multi-lingual games) Client user interface overhaul (those pesky JSONs that are limited to some colors or pictures will be going away and replaced with a more markup-oriented interface system) Virtual events Basic server sharding Cross-platform Editor  
    Thanks to the community for sticking with us for this long, we hope to make Intersect easier to use for all of us and hopefully also give it a chance to live for years to come.
  20. Like
    panda got a reaction from Authentic in Dev Blog 1/20/2021 - 2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7   
    2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7
    1/20/2021
     
    2020 Recap
    2020 was a long year. The road behind us is so long that I'm sure source release feels like it was years ago already, and the road ahead of us is still quite long too. We haven't had a Dev Blog in 9 months so this going to briefly cover everything behind us, explain the present, and peek into what the future will look like for Intersect.

    0.6.2 Branch
    April: Source Release 
    June: Automatic network key generation for source users
    August:
    MonoGame 3.8 from the official feed began improving speed hacking and lag detection September-December:
    Bug fixes (including fixing the client on Linux) minor improvements to timing End of December: master branch dropped from the repository, 6.2 moves from prerelease to main
     
    0.7.0 Branch
    March-July:
    Bug fixes development of the basic plugin system for client-side UI plugins July-September: Minor features, bug fixes
    October-December:
    More minor features bug fixes color adjustment for NPCs from @Cheshire basic action logging on the server side (logins, logouts, etc.) December-Now:
    refactoring of the packet handler system for large performance gains server-side plugin support networking support for plugins asset packing and obfuscation dynamic map layers cooldown groups  
    State of Beta 6.2 (0.6.2-beta)
    As of now, it is all but officially released. It's the main branch and will not have any new major features, but will continue to receive support and bug fixes. This will be officially released soon, but there's no reason for people to not start using it now. In theory we could have released this a long time ago, but we still had a rather steady stream of bug fixes for it. Once the Leafling release hit in December, active development on 0.6.2 was effectively dead and any remaining bugs were kicked to 0.7.

    State of Beta 7 (0.7.0-prerelease and 0.7.0-beta)
    Being real for a second, Beta 7 has been in development the entire time Beta 6.2 was, but the changes being made to the source code were sweeping and would break source modifications. Rather than create a lot of churn for developers, major new features were put into Beta 7 to keep major merges to a minimum. Originally, Beta 6.2 was supposed to release in September and Beta 7 at the end of 2020 -- plans changed.

    0.7.0-prerelease vs 0.7.0-beta
    Due to the massive influx of changes, we've split Beta 7 into two phases -- prerelease and beta.

    Prerelease is in the same state as 0.6.2-beta, it's "live" (and already in the prerelease branch) but not officially announced (until, I suppose, this post). Prerelease is for everyone who is uses Intersect but does not currently need to modify the source. This is to give everyone an opportunity to begin using the new Beta 7 features and testing its stability, as well as finally get access to the plugin system (which while it is not yet on the documentation website, there is an Intersect.Examples solution in the repository with example plugins demonstrating how to use the APIs -- writing plugins is safe, this will not be broken between prerelease and beta).

    Beta is the development branch and will be the "dangerous" branch for the next few months. With the exception of some changes that were harvested from Beta 7 branches and put into Leafling, most of the performance and major bug fixes have yet to be merged in, but this is the branch that they will be put into. The development branch will change a lot, and is not a good base for working with the source because of the amount of code that will soon change. For those of you who like a little bit of risk in their game development, feel free to base your work on the development branch. But keep in mind, here be dragons.
     
    Future of Intersect
    We've gotten to the point where many of the most requested and best features that we can add are simply too difficult to cleanly add or improve. Examples:
    Pixel movement Cross-platform Editor Server sharding Complete localization support Unity support for the client Mobile support Better party/guild (or "group") support Client user interface Complete source cleanup Camera controls Virtual events (sometimes code is just better than the event editor) .NET 5.0
    We have lofty goals for the future, but for the health of the engine and the games developed on it, it's now a necessity. As a result of this list, half of Beta 7 (though with the Leafling release and subsequent performance discoveries a lot was added back on), and all of Beta 8 and 9 were scrapped. Beta 7 will be the last major beta release.

    In all likelihood, many people who make source modifications on top of Beta 6.2 or 7 will not want to move on and redo all of their work on top of an Intersect that supports or is easily modified for the above list of changes, and so Beta 7 will be our first LTS release.
     
    The next major release after 0.7.0-beta will end up being 1.0-rc1. Unfortunately given the amount of changes that need to happen and the personal availability of the developers (in particular myself), any timeline and most specific details will not be realistic to give at this time. That said, in 1.0 we can look forward to at least the following:
    .NET 5.0 (we will be leaving .NET Framework behind, and we will be single-targeting .NET 5.0 -- no multitargeting to other versions of .NET Core or .NET Standard) Complete localization support (this includes content text for multi-lingual games) Client user interface overhaul (those pesky JSONs that are limited to some colors or pictures will be going away and replaced with a more markup-oriented interface system) Virtual events Basic server sharding Cross-platform Editor  
    Thanks to the community for sticking with us for this long, we hope to make Intersect easier to use for all of us and hopefully also give it a chance to live for years to come.
  21. Thanks
    panda got a reaction from Weylon Santana in Dev Blog 1/20/2021 - 2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7   
    2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7
    1/20/2021
     
    2020 Recap
    2020 was a long year. The road behind us is so long that I'm sure source release feels like it was years ago already, and the road ahead of us is still quite long too. We haven't had a Dev Blog in 9 months so this going to briefly cover everything behind us, explain the present, and peek into what the future will look like for Intersect.

    0.6.2 Branch
    April: Source Release 
    June: Automatic network key generation for source users
    August:
    MonoGame 3.8 from the official feed began improving speed hacking and lag detection September-December:
    Bug fixes (including fixing the client on Linux) minor improvements to timing End of December: master branch dropped from the repository, 6.2 moves from prerelease to main
     
    0.7.0 Branch
    March-July:
    Bug fixes development of the basic plugin system for client-side UI plugins July-September: Minor features, bug fixes
    October-December:
    More minor features bug fixes color adjustment for NPCs from @Cheshire basic action logging on the server side (logins, logouts, etc.) December-Now:
    refactoring of the packet handler system for large performance gains server-side plugin support networking support for plugins asset packing and obfuscation dynamic map layers cooldown groups  
    State of Beta 6.2 (0.6.2-beta)
    As of now, it is all but officially released. It's the main branch and will not have any new major features, but will continue to receive support and bug fixes. This will be officially released soon, but there's no reason for people to not start using it now. In theory we could have released this a long time ago, but we still had a rather steady stream of bug fixes for it. Once the Leafling release hit in December, active development on 0.6.2 was effectively dead and any remaining bugs were kicked to 0.7.

    State of Beta 7 (0.7.0-prerelease and 0.7.0-beta)
    Being real for a second, Beta 7 has been in development the entire time Beta 6.2 was, but the changes being made to the source code were sweeping and would break source modifications. Rather than create a lot of churn for developers, major new features were put into Beta 7 to keep major merges to a minimum. Originally, Beta 6.2 was supposed to release in September and Beta 7 at the end of 2020 -- plans changed.

    0.7.0-prerelease vs 0.7.0-beta
    Due to the massive influx of changes, we've split Beta 7 into two phases -- prerelease and beta.

    Prerelease is in the same state as 0.6.2-beta, it's "live" (and already in the prerelease branch) but not officially announced (until, I suppose, this post). Prerelease is for everyone who is uses Intersect but does not currently need to modify the source. This is to give everyone an opportunity to begin using the new Beta 7 features and testing its stability, as well as finally get access to the plugin system (which while it is not yet on the documentation website, there is an Intersect.Examples solution in the repository with example plugins demonstrating how to use the APIs -- writing plugins is safe, this will not be broken between prerelease and beta).

    Beta is the development branch and will be the "dangerous" branch for the next few months. With the exception of some changes that were harvested from Beta 7 branches and put into Leafling, most of the performance and major bug fixes have yet to be merged in, but this is the branch that they will be put into. The development branch will change a lot, and is not a good base for working with the source because of the amount of code that will soon change. For those of you who like a little bit of risk in their game development, feel free to base your work on the development branch. But keep in mind, here be dragons.
     
    Future of Intersect
    We've gotten to the point where many of the most requested and best features that we can add are simply too difficult to cleanly add or improve. Examples:
    Pixel movement Cross-platform Editor Server sharding Complete localization support Unity support for the client Mobile support Better party/guild (or "group") support Client user interface Complete source cleanup Camera controls Virtual events (sometimes code is just better than the event editor) .NET 5.0
    We have lofty goals for the future, but for the health of the engine and the games developed on it, it's now a necessity. As a result of this list, half of Beta 7 (though with the Leafling release and subsequent performance discoveries a lot was added back on), and all of Beta 8 and 9 were scrapped. Beta 7 will be the last major beta release.

    In all likelihood, many people who make source modifications on top of Beta 6.2 or 7 will not want to move on and redo all of their work on top of an Intersect that supports or is easily modified for the above list of changes, and so Beta 7 will be our first LTS release.
     
    The next major release after 0.7.0-beta will end up being 1.0-rc1. Unfortunately given the amount of changes that need to happen and the personal availability of the developers (in particular myself), any timeline and most specific details will not be realistic to give at this time. That said, in 1.0 we can look forward to at least the following:
    .NET 5.0 (we will be leaving .NET Framework behind, and we will be single-targeting .NET 5.0 -- no multitargeting to other versions of .NET Core or .NET Standard) Complete localization support (this includes content text for multi-lingual games) Client user interface overhaul (those pesky JSONs that are limited to some colors or pictures will be going away and replaced with a more markup-oriented interface system) Virtual events Basic server sharding Cross-platform Editor  
    Thanks to the community for sticking with us for this long, we hope to make Intersect easier to use for all of us and hopefully also give it a chance to live for years to come.
  22. Thanks
    panda got a reaction from Zoagel in Dev Blog 1/20/2021 - 2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7   
    2020 Recap, Beta 6.2, Beta 7
    1/20/2021
     
    2020 Recap
    2020 was a long year. The road behind us is so long that I'm sure source release feels like it was years ago already, and the road ahead of us is still quite long too. We haven't had a Dev Blog in 9 months so this going to briefly cover everything behind us, explain the present, and peek into what the future will look like for Intersect.

    0.6.2 Branch
    April: Source Release 
    June: Automatic network key generation for source users
    August:
    MonoGame 3.8 from the official feed began improving speed hacking and lag detection September-December:
    Bug fixes (including fixing the client on Linux) minor improvements to timing End of December: master branch dropped from the repository, 6.2 moves from prerelease to main
     
    0.7.0 Branch
    March-July:
    Bug fixes development of the basic plugin system for client-side UI plugins July-September: Minor features, bug fixes
    October-December:
    More minor features bug fixes color adjustment for NPCs from @Cheshire basic action logging on the server side (logins, logouts, etc.) December-Now:
    refactoring of the packet handler system for large performance gains server-side plugin support networking support for plugins asset packing and obfuscation dynamic map layers cooldown groups  
    State of Beta 6.2 (0.6.2-beta)
    As of now, it is all but officially released. It's the main branch and will not have any new major features, but will continue to receive support and bug fixes. This will be officially released soon, but there's no reason for people to not start using it now. In theory we could have released this a long time ago, but we still had a rather steady stream of bug fixes for it. Once the Leafling release hit in December, active development on 0.6.2 was effectively dead and any remaining bugs were kicked to 0.7.

    State of Beta 7 (0.7.0-prerelease and 0.7.0-beta)
    Being real for a second, Beta 7 has been in development the entire time Beta 6.2 was, but the changes being made to the source code were sweeping and would break source modifications. Rather than create a lot of churn for developers, major new features were put into Beta 7 to keep major merges to a minimum. Originally, Beta 6.2 was supposed to release in September and Beta 7 at the end of 2020 -- plans changed.

    0.7.0-prerelease vs 0.7.0-beta
    Due to the massive influx of changes, we've split Beta 7 into two phases -- prerelease and beta.

    Prerelease is in the same state as 0.6.2-beta, it's "live" (and already in the prerelease branch) but not officially announced (until, I suppose, this post). Prerelease is for everyone who is uses Intersect but does not currently need to modify the source. This is to give everyone an opportunity to begin using the new Beta 7 features and testing its stability, as well as finally get access to the plugin system (which while it is not yet on the documentation website, there is an Intersect.Examples solution in the repository with example plugins demonstrating how to use the APIs -- writing plugins is safe, this will not be broken between prerelease and beta).

    Beta is the development branch and will be the "dangerous" branch for the next few months. With the exception of some changes that were harvested from Beta 7 branches and put into Leafling, most of the performance and major bug fixes have yet to be merged in, but this is the branch that they will be put into. The development branch will change a lot, and is not a good base for working with the source because of the amount of code that will soon change. For those of you who like a little bit of risk in their game development, feel free to base your work on the development branch. But keep in mind, here be dragons.
     
    Future of Intersect
    We've gotten to the point where many of the most requested and best features that we can add are simply too difficult to cleanly add or improve. Examples:
    Pixel movement Cross-platform Editor Server sharding Complete localization support Unity support for the client Mobile support Better party/guild (or "group") support Client user interface Complete source cleanup Camera controls Virtual events (sometimes code is just better than the event editor) .NET 5.0
    We have lofty goals for the future, but for the health of the engine and the games developed on it, it's now a necessity. As a result of this list, half of Beta 7 (though with the Leafling release and subsequent performance discoveries a lot was added back on), and all of Beta 8 and 9 were scrapped. Beta 7 will be the last major beta release.

    In all likelihood, many people who make source modifications on top of Beta 6.2 or 7 will not want to move on and redo all of their work on top of an Intersect that supports or is easily modified for the above list of changes, and so Beta 7 will be our first LTS release.
     
    The next major release after 0.7.0-beta will end up being 1.0-rc1. Unfortunately given the amount of changes that need to happen and the personal availability of the developers (in particular myself), any timeline and most specific details will not be realistic to give at this time. That said, in 1.0 we can look forward to at least the following:
    .NET 5.0 (we will be leaving .NET Framework behind, and we will be single-targeting .NET 5.0 -- no multitargeting to other versions of .NET Core or .NET Standard) Complete localization support (this includes content text for multi-lingual games) Client user interface overhaul (those pesky JSONs that are limited to some colors or pictures will be going away and replaced with a more markup-oriented interface system) Virtual events Basic server sharding Cross-platform Editor  
    Thanks to the community for sticking with us for this long, we hope to make Intersect easier to use for all of us and hopefully also give it a chance to live for years to come.
  23. Sad
    panda got a reaction from Zerinho in How do i put the api from webhost to intersect updater 6.2, using google drive?   
    Google Drive is not supported by the updater that is built into Intersect.
  24. Thanks
    panda got a reaction from Kamus in BETA 7 - (Notas de parche)   
    Muchas gracias por tu ayuda Kamus, ni siquiera hemos escrito nada en ingles.

    Hay más que no se puede ver en el juego, pero estamos mejorando el netcode ahora (estamos probando todo en Leafling ).

     
    Si leías Github has visto que hay algo después.
  25. Sad
    panda got a reaction from Authentic in Problem with Visual Studio 2017 / 2019   
    You probably need to restore nuget packages too, but the issue listed here is most likely because you did not install the development tools for .NET 4.8 via the Visual Studio installer.
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